I Prefer To Think We’re Getting Better

MAZDA_Zoom-Zoom_Stadium_Hiroshima(March_8,_2015) I prefer to think we're getting betterWhile the world has been recalling the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, I prefer to celebrate a different anniversary. Monday, August 10, 2015, marks 70 years without humanity using a nuclear weapon in warfare. Furthermore, humanity has gone 2 years, 5 months and 28 days without a nuclear test. The last confirmed test was conducted by North Korea in February 2013. The Hiroshima Carp baseball team are playing a game in Mazda Zoom-Zoom Stadium in the above picture. The Clover Garden of Nagasaki is in the picture below.

Clover Garden of Nagasaki. I prefer to think we're getting better

I prefer to think we’re getting better

There is yet another positive development I wish to consider. The United States tested a hydrogen bomb on November 1, 1952. A hydrogen bomb or a thermonuclear weapon, uses the energy from a primary nuclear fission reaction to compress and ignite a secondary nuclear fusion reaction. The result is greatly increased explosive power when compared to single-stage fission weapons. Therefore, one could refer to atomic bombs as fission weapons, and hydrogen bombs as fusion weapons. A Russian hydrogen bomb tested in 1961 had roughly 1,350–1,570 times the combined power of the bombs that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

I prefer to think we’re getting better. Russia tested a fusion weapon in 1955. The UK tested a hydrogen bomb in 1957. China tested a fusion bomb in 1967. France tested a hydrogen bomb in 1968. Therefore, humanity has gone 47 years without a nation developing a fusion weapon. Therefore, each of the above nations has gone a number of years without using their most destructive weapon. I consider this to represent a certain evolution on the part of both humanity. Perhaps I shall celebrate the non-use of fusion bombs by these nations in the future.

I prefer to think we’re getting better. There is a certain concern in my world that certain nations with fission weapons (Pakistan and North Korea) will not refrain from using them. There is a certain concern in my world that certain nations (Iran and Saudi Arabia) will acquire fission weapons in the not-too-distant future. What am I going to do about this? Shall I cry out in protest? Shall I advocate certain political positions and policies? Shall I engage and confront certain individuals and organizations?

I prefer to think we’re getting better. I am working on becoming a stronger and better human being. I am taking the Steps to Knowledge. Knowledge is described as “the deeper intelligence that the Creator of all life has placed within each person to guide them, to protect them and to lead them to their greater accomplishments in life.” I am not in denial. I am not simply trying to project a preferred outcome. I am seeing what is transpiring, and I am altering my conclusions regularly as the situation changes. I seek to contribute strength of character and strength of faculties of mind. I am watching—watching without coming to fixed conclusions, watching without condemning the world, watching without losing hope, watching without becoming jaded or cynical, watching without blaming leaders or individuals or nations, watching the changing landscapes of the world.

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Welcome to Mystery of Ascension! Добро пожаловать в Тайну просветления! We document the study of the New Message from God in general, and the book Steps to Knowledge in particular. Мы тут делимся своим опытом изучения Нового Послания от Бога, в общем, и книги Шаги к Знанию в частности. Find out more about us here. Узнайте больше о нас здесь. Find out how to contact us here. Узнайте, как связаться с нами здесь.

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